ofhouseadama:

Why Laura Roslin is a Tyrant, and Why That’s a Good Thing
(aka a meta I’ve been sitting on for a long time now but it’s timely again because we’re talking about this again)

In ancient Greece, tyrants were influential opportunists that came to power by securing the support of different factions of a deme, or people, in a democracy, thus usupring the democracy and replacing it with an autocratic regime. The word “tyrannos”, possibly pre-Greek carried no ethical censure; it simply referred to anyone, good or bad, who obtained executive power in a polis by unconventional means. Support for the tyrants came from the growing middle class and from the peasants who had no land or were in debt to the wealthy landowners.

It is true that they had no legal right to rule, but the people preferred them over kings or the aristocracy. The Greek tyrants stayed in power by using mercenary soldiers from outside of their respective city-state. To mock tyranny, Thales wrote that the strangest thing to see is "an aged tyrant" meaning that tyrants do not have the public support to survive for long. The political theorist Livy (and later Machiavelli, in the 1400s) wrote that tyranny was often looked upon as an intermediate stage between narrow oligarchy and more democratic forms of polity. I’ve already written a lot about the various stages the colonial government goes through, and that can be read here

Laura Roslin is a tyrant. To say otherwise is to be pedantic, in my opinion. 

Her actions are those of a tyrant. Her power, before securing the demos through the prophecy, is very limited, to the point where she’s battling with the Quorum more than we see Adar doing in the flashbacks. Roslin knows in Season One that her power is tenuous. It’s why she relies so heavily on Adama, and it’s why when Adama decides he doesn’t want her to be in power anymore, he succeeds.

Laura Roslin is an unelected official from beginning to end. She’s 43rd in the line of succession. In the United States, if the Hill was blown up during the State of the Union with everyone but the Secretary of Agriculture inside, a special election would be triggered by a Constitutional crisis triggered by the 20th or 25th amendments. Roslin holds onto power by emergency means. She then loses an election, tries to steal it, and becomes president a year later by factions wanting her in power. Roslin never secures long-term political power. Her position is weak and she knows it. She leans heavily on Adama, she leans heavily on the suspension of human rights like the freedom of assembly and the freedom of the press. She tortures Baltar and tortures cylons. She commits what are considered to be war crimes. Her power does not derive from the people, it derives from herself, and her oppression and utilization of others. 

Dirty Hands is the epitome of her power, and it rests on Adama’s security (in opposition to her vulnerability) as the head of the military. Adama is her muscle. He enacts violence in Dirty Hands, he is the one who makes Zarek resign, he is the one who checks her power against Baltar, after torturing him on her orders. 

Roslin is a tyrant, and her power waxes and wanes. As all tyrants’ power does. Their life spans are short — sic semper tyrannus. It’s ironic, in a way, that you can’t tell if her tyranny began with her diagnoses or if her diagnoses spurred her tyranny. But her power is real, and Roslin wields it in a way that oppresses people for the sake of finding Earth, and for the sake of consolidating her own power as well. The mutiny had immense support for a reason — Zarek and Gaeta’s complaints were not illegitimate. Her tyrannical means increased after New Caprica because she felt helpless, and exposed. She feels too comfortable in season four, which is why the mutiny is somewhat successful.  By season four the Quorum is entirely marginalized, Roslin is actively trying to suppress civil rights, and is no longer engaged with the demos. Of course people rebelled against her. 

But that’s the great thing about Laura Roslin. She’s a schoolteacher, someone we (and Bill Adama) immediately code as harmless, but good. But she’s not. She ceased to be the little schoolteacher the minute she got that diagnosis, as we saw in Epiphanies. The attacks just completed the transformation. We know — unlike Gaeta, and Zarek, and the mutineers — that her motives are good. We know from the narrative she really is the prophet. 

That’s the great thing. BSG hands us the decision ourselves to decide if Laura’s tyranny was worth it. It doesn’t shy away from making us make that question, while still making her a completely sympathetic character. Laura Roslin is a tyrant. She can be cruel, and oppressive, and cold. She can also be generous, and compassionate; loving and maternal. She’s not a cartoon villain. And yes, the modern usage of the word tyrant applies to character in a way it never did to the ancient use of the word. But BSG deals in ancient narratives, so that’s how we need to treat Laura Roslin. Just like how we call Kara a messiah, and head!Six and head!Baltar angels, and the all of BSG the story of the flood and the fall. 

Laura Roslin is a tyrant, and it’s a really good thing and we should be excited to talk about it. 

shared July 23, 2014 - 167 notes / via - source
johndarnielle:

giraffepoliceforce:

Still pretty proud of my response to this.

I loved Marvel comics when I was a kid; I was a weird kid who didn’t get down with macho stuff, in part because of the general scene in my house & in part because I was scrawny and couldn’t really front like I was tough. In my tiny limited-to-my-personal-friends-and-surroundings comics scene, the idea that macho norm-enforcer types could be into comics would have come as a huge and deeply disappointing surprise; comics, in my mind, were for people who’d already begun to sense that, in the immortal words of Anti-Flag, “their system doesn’t work for you.”
I hope Marvel systematically “ruins” absolutely every one of their legacy characters forever, one after another, and then D.C. runs a Sgt. Rock miniseries where he renounces violence as a means of conflict resolution. May the grousing of the macho comics dudes ascend to Heaven forever and make an acceptable sacrifice unto Galactus

johndarnielle:

giraffepoliceforce:

Still pretty proud of my response to this.

I loved Marvel comics when I was a kid; I was a weird kid who didn’t get down with macho stuff, in part because of the general scene in my house & in part because I was scrawny and couldn’t really front like I was tough. In my tiny limited-to-my-personal-friends-and-surroundings comics scene, the idea that macho norm-enforcer types could be into comics would have come as a huge and deeply disappointing surprise; comics, in my mind, were for people who’d already begun to sense that, in the immortal words of Anti-Flag, “their system doesn’t work for you.”

I hope Marvel systematically “ruins” absolutely every one of their legacy characters forever, one after another, and then D.C. runs a Sgt. Rock miniseries where he renounces violence as a means of conflict resolution. May the grousing of the macho comics dudes ascend to Heaven forever and make an acceptable sacrifice unto Galactus

shared July 22, 2014 - 19,925 notes / via - source
Mulder, where are you going?
shared July 22, 2014 - 8,009 notes / via - source

Sixes are powerful, driven beings, constantly looking for ways to influence or determine events. They love human sensuality in all its forms, and see their bodies as the highest temple in praise of God that has yet been constructed. They are also deeply manipulative and have a tendency towards physical and emotional cruelty.

shared July 22, 2014 - 1,272 notes / via - source

my sarcasm is at its best when I hear a stupid question

shared July 21, 2014 - 32,634 notes / via - source
kevinwada:

Emma Frost
HeroesCon 2014 sketch
Made for THEE kristaferanka.  Business glamor.  Business HBIC.  It’s 90s Chanel and Charlize Theron.  She don’t need nobody.

kevinwada:

Emma Frost

HeroesCon 2014 sketch

Made for THEE kristaferanka.  Business glamor.  Business HBIC.  It’s 90s Chanel and Charlize Theron.  She don’t need nobody.

shared July 21, 2014 - 1,003 notes / via - source

MBTI most accurate descriptions

woolfhammer:

ESTP: super attractive physically but it’s all downhill from there. never quite know what they’re going to do next but you can probably bet it will be irresponsible. somehow still lovable. 

ESTJ: loud, logical, and get shit done — they are the warrior class of the life rpg. power stats make them unbeatable and if you encounter one, maybe just curl up and forfeit, to save time. 

ESFP: giggly little shits. fun fun fun till her daddy takes the t-bird away. great for lifting your mood, not that great at lifting your credit score. 

ESFJ: too appropriate, totally lacking in awkwardness. they’ll never forget your birthday, which will make you feel like shit when you constantly forget theirs. 

ENTP: excellent companions if you enjoy people who instantly see through all your shit. very clever and very intuitive, you can’t fool them. i suggest you invest in other friends — ones you *can* fool. 

ENTJ: impatient with people who make mistakes, namely, everyone. they’ll respect you if you stand up to them but why do that when you can run away instead. cuddle them and see what happens. i’m curious.

ENFP: too puppy to live. best suited for the profession of musical nanny. not advised for use around an open flame. 

ENFJ: way too charming and capable, maybe they should stop making everyone else look bad. prone to making other people care about stuff they didn’t want to care about. so annoying. 

ISTP: such butts. best suited for an apocalypse scenario, if no such scenario exists, they will create danger because they get bored. don’t encourage them, but don’t discourage them, as reverse psychology works too well.

ISTJ: low drama and low maintenance, best value at this price tier. best suited to actual human existence. least weird, which makes them kinda weird.

ISFP: squishy little darlings you might want to keep in your pocket, but please don’t or they will become forlorn. they notice everything, and it’s unnerving. 

ISFJ: quietly and proudly do things for others. if you have a ring you need to deliver to mordor, take an ISFJ along with you for best results. 

INTP: cute intergalactic spiders you want to hug and mistrust. prone to making you laugh but then days later you will wonder whether you were the butt of the joke. 

INTJ: major dicks and kinda proud of it. prone to being right. prone to liking trance music way too much. all the ones i’ve ever met have been unexpectedly kinky. so i guess, expectedly. 

INFP: they fall out of the sky and are raised by unicorns. if you feed one it will follow you home. they dissipate in water. 

INFJ: chameleons appropriating your emotions and going quietly mad. prone to meltdowns and needing lots of naps.

shared July 21, 2014 - 28,390 notes / via - source

metaphorformetaphor:

Do you have hope for the future?
someone asked Robert Frost, toward the end.
Yes, and even for the past, he replied,
that it will turn out to have been all right
for what it was, something we can accept,
mistakes made by the selves we had to be,
not able to be, perhaps, what we wished,
or what looking back half the time it seems
we could so easily have been, or ought…
The future, yes, and even for the past,
that it will become something we can bear.

—David Ray, “Thanks, Robert Frost”  from Greatest hits, 1960-2004. Pudding House Publications, 2004

shared July 21, 2014 - 245 notes / via - source

sandandglass:

Jon Stewart tries to get Hillary Clinton to say she’s running for president.

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